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Towns in Chilton County

Clanton
During the War Between the States the territory that is now Clanton, the County Seat of Chilton County, was a part of a large estate belonging to Joseph Williams of Mulberry Community. A son, Tom Williams, had the land in charge; it consisted of old fields, marshes and canebreaks, and was used as a pasture for the hundreds of cattle belonging to the Williamses. The marshes and creeks were fine places for wild ducks, and it is said that many hunters from down on the river and other parts of the county came to this section to shoot ducks. On the spot of ground where the Clanton Baptist Church now stands, then stood a dilapidated old log house, in which lived the wife and children of William Riley Robinson...
Thorsby

Thorson Home, Thorsby, ALIn 1894 K. G. Faegre, J. F. Peterson and T. T. Thorson, men from the cold Northern states conceived the idea of coming South and forming a Northern Colony. They organized under the name of the Concordia Land Company, and purchased considerable land around all sides of the present town site of Thorsby. The Post Office at Strassburg was abolished and removed to Thorsby and, as the saying goes, "Thorsby was put on the map." People began to come from the North to look over the country and many of them bought land. It was a common sight to see No. 1 stop at Thorsby in those days to let off tourists.

Jemison
Jemison, like a great many other towns between Birmingham and Montgomery, came into existence on account of the building of the Louisville and Nashville Railroad. Though before the railroad was built there was a community known as Langstonville, named in honor of Mrs. Louise Langston, who owned practically all the land Jemison now occupies. Later the name was changed to Jemison for Robert Jemison of Birmingham, who operated a stage line from Montgomery to Tuscaloosa, and a camp was located at the present site for a night stopping place.
Maplesville
Maplesville was the largest settlement in southeastern Cahawba County [now southwestern Chilton County], and in time it grew to be the most important. It took its name from an early inhabitant, Steven W. Maples, who established and operated a small pioneer store in the very early days of the settlement. When he built his store is a matter of conjecture, but it is believed that it was either in 1819 or 1820. The first settlers began to arrive in the Maplesville area about the same time as those on the Little Cahawba River, that is, during the last days of the Mississippi Territorial period in 1816. They settled on the high ground ovelrooking Mulberry Creek and along the small streams that empty into the main stream. The water was pure, the soil was good, and the forest was dark with giant trees.
Verbena
The settlement of Verbena began between 1860 and 1870. At this time yellow fever was the dread of the southern part of the state. In order to escape the heat and fever, Captain John Hughes, Milo Barrett, Warren Brown, Josiah Morris, Colonel B.J. Baldwin, Dr. W.O. Baldwin, William Hughes, John Clisby, G.S. Wirt, Major J. Carr Gibson, Colonel P.T. Sayre, all of Montgomery, built summer homes or made permanent ones there. It was first known as Summerfield, but near Selma, Alabama, was another settlement by that name. It was necessary to rename the village and to Miss Kate Norton was given the task of re-christening it. Because of the wild verbena growing so abundantly there, she name it Verbena.
Back You are here: Home History Chilton County History Displaying items by tag: About MyALRoots
History of Chilton County, Alabama

Ted was born in Mobile, Alabama and experienced serious illness as a child including a mild case of infantile paralysis and pneumonia. The latter required that a breathing tube be inserted into his side for a period of time. As a young boy Ted began a life-long love of books and reading. Though he was only able to complete the tenth grade of high school (due to school closures during the Great Depression), he was an avid reader throughout his life becoming self-educated on a wide variety of subjects.

Ted worked his entire life as a carpenter. Starting out as a young man he worked at Arkie Mahan's [John Archimedes Mahan (1878-1945)] cabinet shop making custom furniture. A member of the Carpenters Union, he then worked as a carpenter building homes, moving quite frequently as necessitated by new jobs. In 1948 the family moved to Illinois where better jobs were available in the post-war building boom. In addition, Ted and Louise's oldest daughter was school age, and they were seeking better schools than those that existed in Chilton County, Alabama. Initially, Ted worked building new residential subdivisions and commercial buildings but later worked for many years helping to build the system of Interstate highways that criss-cross the Chicago Metropolitan area. He retired in 1977 but remained a lifelong member of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America, achieving 50 years of continuous membership on April 22, 1990.

Ted loved working with wood and was skilled in most construction trades (construction, basic plumbing, electrical, pouring concrete, drywall, finish and trim work, painting, laying brick, etc.). When his daughter Linda was young she would often proudly proclaim that "my Daddy can do anything" and she wasn't far from being right! When the couple bought their home in Des Plaines, Ted added a double garage and finished the bi-level basement into a family room, laundry room and shop area. He also built a dining room china cabinet and hutch out of maple, copied from one manufactured by Ethan Allen Furniture Company. Later when Ted and Louise retired, returned to Alabama, and bought the home in Mineral Springs, Ted built a large detached shop building on the property with a greenhouse attached to the back. He also remodeled the house, removing wallpaper, painting and building shelves for Louise's collection of vintage glassware and dishes.

Ted was known as a gentle man, loved and respected by all who knew him. He worked hard his entire life and loved his family dearly, always taking special delight in his two daughters. His wife Louise was his best friend. He loved children, often paying special attention to nieces and nephews and other children in the large extended family. On December 19, 1980 he underwent triple-bypass surgery on his heart and it was the beginning of a slow decline in his health. Though he was able to continue to do some work around the house and in the yard he had to watch the type of work and take it easy. In early 1994 he underwent a second heart operation to replace the artificial valves implanted during his first surgery. Though the heart surgery went well, he suffered a collapsed lung following the surgery and was unable to recover. He passed away on February 1, 1994 with Louise and daughter Linda at his hospital bedside (University of Alabama Hospital, Birmingham, Jefferson County, Alabama).

Ted's obituary read: Travis E. Mahan, age 78, of Clanton, died Februaryy 1, 1994. He was a veteran of the Marine Corps and employed as a carpenter. Funeral will be held 11:00 a.m. February 3, 1994 at Martin Chapel in Clanton with burial in the Clanton City Cemetery, Martin Funeral Home, Inc., Clanton, directing. Visitation will be at Martin Chapel 6-8 p.m. Wednesday. Survivors include his wife, Mrs. Louise Mahan, daughter, Miss Linda Mahan of Sandpoint, Idaho, granddaughter, Miss Sherri Amber of Des Plaines, ILL., grandson, Mr. Keith Amber of Eugene, OR, and sister, Mrs. Ruth Fijfr of Zilina, Slovakia. He was preceeded in death by a daughter, Mrs. Sondra Amber.

Additional Info

  • Article Source


    All information provided and article written by Linda L. Mahan, youngest daughter of Travis Exel Mahan.

  • Photo Credit

    Linda L. Mahan

  • Research Notes

    Though Ted's obituary states he was a "veteran of the Marine Corps", he actually served in the Merchant Marines during World War II. In his daughter's memory, Ted never spoke of his service during the war, but other relatives remember him being stationed in Mobile, Alabama, building ships and later serving on a ship in the Pacific theatre. This is supported by the fact that his name is included on the crew list for the merchant ship Mission Soledad in 1945.

Published in Mahan

Mary Louise Giles was the second child and first daughter born to Albert Lomer Giles (1884-1967) and Amry Loutish (Willis) Giles (1894-1980). She was born in Clanton, Alabama at her grandmother's (Nancy Elizabeth Robinson Giles) home. The family was living on a farm located on County Road 51 in Mineral Springs, Alabama, not far from the Mineral Springs Baptist Church, but Amry had gone to her mother-in-law's home in Clanton to have the baby. As a child Louise was especially close to her paternal grandmother, Nancy Elizabeth (Robinson) Giles (1850-1927). She often spoke of going to her grandmother's home and being allowed to handle and wash the dishes in the china cabinet, starting a life long love of dishes and glassware.

As Louise grew up, her mother Amry had to work in the fields on the family farm during the day and much of the child rearing for the five younger children in the family was left to Louise. Consequently, she was often viewed as a "second mother" by her younger siblings. Very special to Louise was the birth of Betty Jean, her only sister, when she was age 16. Louise treasured Betty Jean and remained close to her throughout her life. Another important connection for Louise was her sister-in-law, Edna Mae Cleckler Giles (1917-2007), who married Louise's older brother, John Cecil Giles (1913-1987) in 1934.

Abt 1937-Louise Giles at college in Chillicothe, MOLouise did not graduate from high school until age 19 or 20 as the schools in Chilton County were forced to close for two years during the Depression. Due to the schools closure many teenagers, especially the boys, did not complete high school during this period, as they went to work to help support the family or married and started their own family. Louise did return to school, however, and completed high school. Following graduation from high school Louise attended business college in Chillicothe, Missouri, an unusual accomplishment for women in the mid-1930's. While at college, Louise entered a beauty contest and was first runner up. (In the photo at the top of this page, Louise is 5th from the left in the lineup.) After completing business college Louise returned to Alabama, working for J. Kress & Company in Birmingham creating window displays. 

As their families were related, Louise knew Travis (Ted) Exel Mahan through much of her life.  In addition, both Ted and Cecil, Louise's older brother, were working at Arkie Mahan's cabinet shop and Ted often came to the family home for dinner. They were married in April 24, 1938, when both Louise and Ted were age 22. The couple moved relatively frequently in the early years of their marriage due to Ted's construction jobs, living  in a mobile home in Tuscaloosa, Clanton, Mobile, Pensacola, and Louisville. They owned a home (referred to locally as the "old Gilmore home") on County Road 51 in Mineral Springs not far from the family farm where Louise was raised.

1959-Louise at work at KleinschmidtIn December 1948 the couple moved to Cook County, Illinois where they raised their two daughters, Sondra Sue and Linda Louise. Like in Alabama, the family initially lived in a mobile home, first in Lockport, then Wheeling, and finally settling in Des Plaines, near the O'hare Airport. In the late 1950's, the couple bought a 3-bedroom, bi-level brick home at 1940 Shepherd Drive in Des Plaines. Within a year Sondra married and lived in Florida. Ted and Louise remained in this home until they retired in about 1978.

In about 1953 Louise went to work at Kleinschmidt, a company that made teletype machines and later produced much of the communication equipment for the Apollo space program. Louise started on the assembly line, working her way up to Tester and Adjuster, one of the few women to achieve this position. Louise continued to work for Kleinschmidt until retirement in 1978 at age 63 when she and Ted moved back to Alabama.

Ted and Louise returned to Alabama in about 1979 and purchased a home on County Road 68 in Mineral Springs not far from where Louise grew up. The home was located on 9.5 acres but Ted and Louise later bought the adjoining five acres. Ted built a large shop with a greenhouse on the back side. They both enjoyed gardening, planting many flowering shrubs and flowers. They also planted a large garden each year with Louise doing a wide variety of canning including jelly, jam, pears, green beans, tomatoes, pickles, and much more. Her jelly/jam, pickles and canned vegetables won many ribbons at the Chilton County fair over the years.

Louise and Ted's oldest daughter, Sondra Sue, was diagnosed with breast cancer in the early 1970's, at age 31. After a masectomy and chemotherapy, Sondra initially did well, but the cancer returned five years later and spread through much of her body. Sondra's illness was hard on her parents and Louise spent as much time as possible with her. In September 1980, Sondra's health declined rapidly and she was hospitalized. Louise and Ted traveled to Illinois to be with her, spending as much time at the hospital as they could manage. During this same period, Amry Willis Giles, Louise's mother also became very ill with cancer, passing away on 15 September 1980 while Louise was in Illinois. Though it was very hard on Louise to miss her mother's funeral, she simply could not leave Sondra knowing she had only days yet to live. Sondra passed away two weeks later on October 02, 1980. Two months later Ted underwent open heart surgery for a triple-bypass. The surgery went well but it was the beginning of a slow decline in Ted's health. Needless to say, 1980 was a very tough year for Louise and her family.

Louise was accomplished in all the homemaker crafts including sewing, knitting, embroidery and quilting. She made many of her own clothes and those of her children, throughout her life. Her daughter Linda took dance lessons throughout elementary and high school, with Louise making all of her dance recital costumes and those for several of her friends. Amry, Louise's mother had always been a quilter and Louise often helped her and other friends or relatives quilt hand-pieced quilts. Louise also quilted as a young woman and took it up again in her retirement, making several pieced and yoyo quilts for the family home and for her daughter Linda.

Louise loved Depression glass and dishes and accumulated a large collection of both. She was a frequent visitor to flea markets and yard sales buying individual pieces or entire sets of dishes. Louise filled not one but four china cabinets in her dining room. Ted accommodated Louise's collection by building more and more shelves as the collection grew, eventually lining all the basement walls with deep shelves that Louise piled to capacity with glassware and dishes. When the shelves were full, she filled boxes and boxes with more glassware and dishes. Louise often held yard sales out of the basement becoming known for her collection of Depression glass and china cups and saucers.

OCT 1996-Louise with Linda, showing off her broken ankleTed passed away in 1994 and Louise continued to live in the Mineral Springs house. On October 06, 1996, Louise was home alone and started down the stairs to the basement to wash a pair of pants. Her foot slipped off the top step and she fell head first down the basement stairs in her home. When she landed at the bottom, her hand was bleeding heavily from a small cut. She tried to stand and knew right away that her right ankle was broken. As she was home alone, she scooted on her rear end the length of the basement to the outside door, opened it and tried to yell to the neighbor across the road. The neighbor did not hear her calls for help, however. Louise remained in the basement for nine hours before she found a fireplace poker and used it to drag a telephone off a bookcase and call her sister, Betty Jean Klinner, for help. Betty Jean and two other family members transported Louise to the Alabaster Medical Center where she was treated in the emergency room. She was x-rayed and a temporary cast was placed on her lower right leg. The following day she was evaluated by Dr. Braken. He noted a fracture in her right leg just above the ankle, as well as multiple bruises on her right arm, right hip and back, and both legs. Louise stayed with Betty Jean for the next five days until Linda, her daughter, arrived from Idaho to care for her. Linda stayed for a week and arranged for home health care. Louise was equipped with a walker, potty chair, and shower chair. Linda also helped Louise buy a motorized lift chair to assist her in standing. Louise wore the cast for approximately 8 weeks before it was removed. Dr. Braken felt the bone mended well, but Louise continued to have difficulty walking due to loss in muscle strength while sitting with the cast. The ankle also subsequently developed arthritis in the joints.

Following this injury Louise's mobility declined. She fell several times, once into a red ant hill in the yard resulting in numerous stings and another time falling and breaking her collar bone. In her mid-80's Louise's memory began a rapid decline and she was diagnosed with Altzheimer's Disease in early fall 2001. A few months later in January 2002 she was diagnosed with colon cancer, undergoing surgery to remove a portion of her colon. She survived the surgery well but the cancer was advanced and the doctors recommended that she not undergo chemotherapy as it would be hard on her and would not extend her life. Due to her mother's health, Linda moved to Alabama to care for her. Louise's health continued to decline and she passed away in her home the following year on May 5, 2003. She was buried next to her husband on May 7th at the City Cemetery, Clanton, Chilton County, Alabama.

Additional Info

  • Article Source


    This article was written by Linda L. Mahan, the youngest daughter of Mary Louise Giles Mahan, who is also the Founder and Chief Editor of this website. All information in article is provided by Linda L. Mahan.

  • Photo Credit


    Photo supplied by Linda L. Mahan.

Published in Giles

The Founder and Chief Editor of My Alabama Roots descends from families that migrated to the American colonies from England and Ireland in the early 1700's or earlier, and settled in Alabama before statehood or shortly thereafter. The maternal family lines are the Willis and Giles families, paternal family lines include the Mahan and Ford families...and three of these families descend from the Robinson/Robertson family. Descendants of these families still live in Chilton County, Alabama, representing close to 200 years of residence in Central Alabama.

Our research has not yet identified the initial migrating family member(s) for most of our family lines (due to common given and surnames), but the Editor's earliest known ancestors were already in America by the mid-1600's or early 1700's, living mainly in the Virginia, Maryland and New Jersey area. From there, the Mahans started in Virginia, migrated through western Virginia (now West Virginia and Kentucky) to the area that became eastern Tennessee, arriving in central Alabama in about 1816 before the territory became a state. The Giles and Willis families migrated south through the Carolinas to Georgia, arriving in Alabama by the 1830's. Descendants of these families are still in Central Alabama today, though branches of each family continued the migration westward, settling in Mississippi, Texas, Arkansas, Missouri and elsewhere. Ancestors of my fourth grandparent (Ford family) migrated from Virginia into Kentucky, then continued on to Missouri before heading south into Texas, where my grandfather met my grandmother, married her and brought her back to Alabama. Ford descendants live in Texas to this day.

Our complete family tree can be found on Ancestry.com, entitled My Alabama Roots (Mahan-Giles-Willis-Ford-Robinson) and is Tree #5751580. As of this writing, the tree includes 18,398 people, 1,473 photos, 407 stories/articles, 4,415 records, and over 150 comments. My Alabama Roots family tree is "public" meaning it can ve viewed by all Ancestry.com members. If you are a descendant of any family in our family tree and want to be "invitied" to join our tree so you have greater access to information, contact me at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

Published in About Us

 Putting Family Events in the Context of History

This time line includes events affecting a number of families in our extended family, including the Mahan, Ford, Giles, Willis, Klinner, and Robinson families. To put these events into a larger context, select national and regional events are included along with anecdotal county happenings taken from the Genealogical Abstracts from Chilton County Papers.

Year

Date

State

Location

Family Event

Year

Date

State

Location

National, Regional, & Local Events

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

~1632

 

MD

County Clare

Samuel Mahan born (date approximate), the earliest known Mahan ancestor (Greatx8 Grandfather of Ted Mahan)

 

 

 

 

 

1655

 

VA

Northampton County

Samuel Mahan born in Greater Wicco Parish (Greatx7 Grandfather of Ted Mahan)

1653

Feb-02

NY

New York City

New Amsterdam becomes a city; later renamed New York City

~1690

 

VA

Northumberland

Thomas Mahan born in Virginia, date approximate (Greatx6 Grandfather of Ted Mahan)

1702

Jan-20

AL

Mobile

Fort Louis de la Mobile established on a bluff 27 miles up the Mobile River from Mobile Bay.

1731

Apr-12

VA

Northumberland

Thomas Mahan, Jr. born in Virginia (Greatx5 Grandfather of Ted Mahan)

1717

 

AL

 

Fort Toulouse on the Coosa River constructed to trade with the Indians and offset influence of British.

1750

Apr-27

VA

Frederick County

John Mahan, Sr. born near Winchester, in Frederick County, Virginia (Greatx4 Grandfather of Ted Mahan)

1753

 

NC

Rowan County

Rowan County, NC was formed in 1753 from Anson County and initially encompassed most of the western part of the state and included the territory that became Tennessee. This large land mass ultimately was divided into forty-five counties--twenty-four in North Carolina and all of Tennessee. Because its county seat, Salisbury, lay at the junction of the East-West trading path and the North-South great Philadelphia Wagon Road, thousands of people passed through and/or settled in this vast territory.

1754

 

VA

Frederick

Mary Scott, wife of John Mahan, Sr. , born in Frederick, Virginia (Greatx4 Grandmother of Ted Mahan)

 

 

 

 

 

1756 –1763

 

 

 

French and Indian War won by Great Britain; France ceded territorial claims east of the Mississippi River to Britain and those west of the River to Spain.

1760

 

 

 

Thomas Giles, Sr. born (father of John Giles, grandfather of Edmund O. Giles)

1763

 

 

 

Treaty of Paris – France surrendered it’s vast North American empire to Britain.

1771

 

VA

 

John Mahan, Sr. and Mary Scott are married in Virginia

1770-1783

 

 

 

From 1770 to 1783 both VA and PA claimed the same area – VA called it Monongahela County and PA called it Cumberland County. In 1771 Bedford County was formed out of Cumberland County.

1777

Jan-31

SC

Edgefield County

Nancy Ann Collins born (wife of John Robinson )

1775-1783

 

 

 

The American Revolutionary War, also known as the American War of Independence, was a war between Great Britain and revolutionaries within thirteen British colonies, who declared their independence as the United States of America in 1776 and seceded from the government of Great Britain. The war eventually widened far beyond British North America; many Native Americans also fought on both sides of the conflict.

1777

Jan-01

VA

 

John Mahan, Sr. enlisted and served as Lieutenant in Revolutionary War.

1778

Sep-23

VA

 

Lt. John Mahan, Sr. completed service in the Union Army during Revolutionary War. John and his brother James Irvin were probably in the Monongahela River region of Virginia following the war. This area is West Virginia today.

1777-1778

 

VA

Western Virginia

It is likely that John Mahan and James Mahan were more involved in the Indian Wars during the Revolutionary War period, than in any struggle with the British. They were living on the edge of the frontier in what was basically Indian hunting land. It is likely that they operated in the area of Fort Pitt and the Monongahela region.

1776-1794

 

 

Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Kentucky, Tennessee

A series of conflicts that were a continuation of the Cherokee struggle against the encroachment into their territory by American frontiersmen broke out into open warfare in 1776 between Cherokee led by Dragging Canoe and frontier settlers in middle Tennessee and Kentucky. The Chickamauga Indians were not a separate tribe, but a term used to distinguish between Indians from a number of tribes who were followers of Dragging Canoe (Cherokee) and those abiding by the peace treaties of 1777. These conflicts led by Dragging Canoe continued for almost 20 years.

~1780

 

NC

 

The exact year the John Mahan family moved to North Carolina is not known, other than it was shortly after the conclusion of the Revolutionary War. During this period, North Carolina extended from the Atlantic Ocean to the Mississippi River. Christian Mahan, first daughter and second child born to John Mahan, Sr. and Mary Scott Mahan, is various reported as being born in Virginia or North Carolina, probably in 1780 (reports vary between 1780 and 1781 but the third child was born August 1781)

1781

Oct-19

VA

Yorktown

General Lord Charles Cornwallis, commander of the British army, surrendered to General George Washington, ending the armed conflict of the Revolutionary War. Five months later in March 1782, the British parliament decided to no longer use military force to regain control of the thirteen colonies, but did not recognize American independence.

1780-1790

 

NC

Greene County

John Mahan, Sr. and his brother James Mahan are in Greene County, NC which was created from Washington County in 1783 and covered most of what is now eastern Tennessee. The lineage of John Mahan continues in this general locality for almost 20 years. During this period John Mahan reportedly served as a Captain in the campaign against the Chickamauga Indians conducted in the Tennessee territory. Payment for this service was recorded as being made May 28, 1790, but it had no doubt been rendered in 1788. [from summary of record filed in D.A.R. Library, Washington, D.C.]

1780-1783

 

TN-NC

 

Virginia Governor Thomas Jefferson sent an expedition of 700 Virginians and North Carolinians against the Chickamauga in December 1780 under the command of Sevier. It fought a Cherokee war party at Boyd’s Creek and then marched against the Overhill towns on the Little Tennessee and Hiwassie. In September 1782, another expedition under Sevier once again destroyed the Chickamauga towns and those of the Lower Cherokee down to Ustanali, including what was called Vann’s Town. While it is known that John Mahan served as a Captain during this period, no information is available about which battles he took part in.

1780

 

NC

Rowan County

William Willis born (father of Joseph Yerby Willis)

1782

Nov

 

 

“Preliminary articles of peace” were signed stating the British recognized American independence, but they were not to be effective until they were included in a final treaty.

~1781

 

GA

Wilkes County

John Giles born, date approximate (father of Edmund O. Giles)

1783

Sep-03

 

 

Treaty of Paris 1783, signed on 03 Sep 1783 and ratified by the U.S. Congress on 14 Jan 1784, formally ended the American Revolutionary War between Kingdom of Great Britain and the United States of America. The Treaty was ratified by Britain on 09 April 1784 and ratifications were exchanged on 12 May 1784.

1781

Aug-08

NC

 

John Mahan, Jr. born in North Carolina on 08 Aug 1781. (Greatx3 Grandfather of Ted Mahan).

1787

 

SC

Edgefield County

John Robinson born (father of John Monroe Robinson)

1787

 

 

 

United States Constitution written.

1790

 

VA

Winchester

Thomas Mahan died near Winchester, Virginia (Greatx5 Grandfather of Ted Mahan)

1789

Jan

 

 

George Washington took office as first President of United States

1790

 

GA

Wilkes County

Thomas Giles (father of John Giles) awarded Land Grant of 200 acres in Wilkes County, GA.

1790

 

NY

 

Creek Indians negotiate Treaty of New York with U.S. govt. Treaty ceded Creek territory in Georgia to the U.S. and acknowledged Indian rights in western Georgia and Alabama.

1790

 

NC

 

Cicily Coats born, date approximate (wife of William Willis )

 

 

 

 

 

1790

 

NC-TN

 

John Mahan settled on land in Greene County that would later become part of Sevier County, Tennessee. They probably remained on the same land but county boundaries changed, changing the locale from Greene County to Knox and Sevier.

1791

 

TN

Greene, Knox and Sevier County

In 1791 Jefferson County was created from Greene and Hawkins Counties, with most land coming from Greene County. Soon after, in 1792, Knox County was also created from Greene County land, becoming the largest county in the state. In 1794 Sevier County was created from Jefferson.

 

 

 

 

 

1794

Mar-14

 

 

Eli Whitney invents cotton gin in 1793, receiving patent in March 1794.

 

 

 

 

 

1795

Jun-01

TN

 

Tennessee admitted to Union as 16th state, with capital at Knoxville and John Sevier as the first governor.

 

 

 

 

 

1798

 

MS

 

Mississippi Territory organized from Georgia’s western land claims, including Alabama.

1803

 

SC

Edgefield County

Selah Pike born (second wife of John Robinson )

1800

 

 

 

Thomas Jefferson elected President of the United States.

~1807

Dec

GA

Greene County

Thomas Giles, Sr. died (date approximate)

1805-1806

 

 

Alabama

Indian cessions opened up to white settlement in large portions of western (Choctaw) and northern (Chickasaw and Cherokee) Alabama.

1808

May-12

GA

Putnam County

John Robinson and Nancy Ann Collins are married (parents of John Monroe Robinson)

 

 

 

 

 

1809

Oct-05

Ger

Bremen

John Henry Klinner born in Bremen, Germany. He migrated to America in the early 1840’s and made his home in the Stanton, Chilton County area.

 

 

 

 

 

1810

Feb-27

NC

Rowan County

William Willis and Cicily Coats are married (parents of Joseph Yerby Willis)

1810

 

 

 

West Florida, from Pearl River to the Mississippi, annexed by United States from Spain.

1810

 

NC-TN

Sevier County

John Mahan was issued a land grant in Sevier County in 1810 for 344 acres; this land, quoting from said grant was "bounded by Floyd Nichols conditional line and the west fork of Little Pigeon River on the North by Samuel Wear and said river; on the South by Alexander Montgomery and on the East and vacant land on the West.  This Mahan tract was surveyed in 1807, and like all such early grants here was issued on an "occupancy" claim which indicates that John Mahan was an early settler - perhaps as early as 1790. [from letter by J.A. Sharp]

 

 

 

 

 

1811

 

TN

 

John Mahan, Jr.and Rebecca Crowson married, probably in Tennessee (exact date not known)

1812-1815

Jun-18

 

 

United States declared war on Great Britain in what came to be known as the War of 1812. This war was fought on at least four fronts for as many reasons; some have said this was actually two separate wars

1813-1814

 

TN

AL

Knox & Sevier County, TN and Central Alabma

At the outbreak of the War of 1812, John Mahan and his family were living in Sevier County, TN. When the Tennessee Mounted Volunteers were called upon to help fight the Creek Indians, all four of the Mahan sons (Edward, John Jr., James, and Archimedes) enlisted. Tradition states they enlisted in TN and were on their way to join him at New Orleans, traveling through central Alabama, when they heard the war was over. They liked the area that was to become Perry and Bibb County. Following the war, John Mahan and his sons moved to this area. It is not known if the brothers actually participated in any of the battles against the Creek Indians.

1814

Mar

TN-AL

 

General Andrew Jackson led a force of Tennessee militia, Cherokee warriors, and the 39th U.S. Infantry southward to attack the Creek tribes. On March 27, Jackson and General John Coffee fought the Red Sticks Creek Indians at Horseshoe Bend (a bend in the Tallapoosa River in Central Alabama). This was the major battle of the Creek War, in which Jackson sought to “clear” Alabama for American settlement. Jackson pursued the surviving Creeks to Wetumpka, near present-day Montgomery, Alabama, where they surrendered. On 09 Aug 1814 General Jackson forced the Creeks to sign a treaty ceding 23 million acres—half of Alabama and part of southern Georgia—to the U.S. government.

1815

Feb 3 – Apr 3

GA

Putnam County

John Giles (father of Edmund O. Giles) drafted and served as a private in war against the Creek Indians.

1815

Jan-08

LA

New Orleans

Battle of New Orleans took place at the end of the War of 1812, when the United States forces defeated the British. The treaty which ended the war had been signed, though not ratified, over two weeks earlier but the news had not yet reached the southern front.

1816

 

 

Cahaba [Bibb] County

John Mahan, Sr. and all of his family moved from Gannett's Cove, Sevier County, Tennessee to old Cahaba County (now Bibb County) Alabama. They built their first log cabin near the site of the old Smith Cemetery located on the new State Highway 25, approximately 5 miles SW of Montevallo and 15 miles NE of Centerville. [Greatx4 Grandfather of Ted Mahan]

 

 

 

 

 

1816

 

AL

Talladega County

Following the move of the entire Mahan family to Cahaba/Bibb County, Alabama, John Mahan, Jr ., son of John Mahan, Sr., moved to Talladega County and built the first house above the big spring. (exact date of move to Talladega County is not known, John may have remained in Bibb County for a period of time with his father and two brothers Edward and James.)

1817

Mar-03

AL

 

The Alabama Territory created when Congress passes the enabling act allowing the division of the Mississippi Territory and the admission of Mississippi into the union as a state.

1816

May-04

SC

 

Rhoda Wilson born. [wife of John Henry Klinner ]

1818

Feb-7

AL

Shelby County

Shelby County established out of territory nominally taken from Montgomery County.

1817

Jun-01

GA

Fayette County

John Monroe Robinson born.

1818

Feb-09

AL

Dallas County

Dallas County established out of territory nominally taken from Montgomery, named in honor of celebrated financier Mr. A. J. Dallas of Pennsylvania.

1818

Jan-04

AL

Montevallo, Shelby County

John Archimedes Mahan born (father of Henry Matison Mahan)

1818

Feb-12

AL

Bibb/Cahaba County

Cahaba County established out of territory originally taken from Monroe County; name changed Bibb County 04 Dec 1820 to honor Dr. Wm. W. Bibb, the first governor.

1820

Apr-07

AL

Bibb County

[Major] John Mahan, Sr. died in or near Cahaba, Bibb County, Alabama. He is buried in Smith Cemetery near the spot where the Mahan’s built their first log cabin. (Greatx4 Grandfather of Ted Mahan)

1819

Dec-14

AL

 

Alabama is the 22nd state admitted to the union.

1820

 

NC

Rowan County

Joseph Yerby Willis born (son of William Willis and Cicily Coats, Father of Joseph Yerby Willis, Jr.)

1819

Dec-13

AL

Jefferson County

Jefferson County established out of territory taken from Blount County.

 

 

 

 

 

1819

Dec-13

AL

Perry County

Perry County established, taken from territory that for the most part belonged to no county.

1820

 

GA

Walton County

1820 Walton County census lists John Robinson with wife Nancy, one daughter and five sons. (John Monroe Robinson’s parents)

1820

 

AL

 

1820 Federal Census

Alabama population=144,317

White population=96,245

Black population=48,082

Slaves=47,449, Free blacks=633

1821

Jun-13

GA

Walton County

John Robinson married Selah Pike shortly after the death of his first wife Nancy Ann Collins Robinson .

 

 

 

 

 

1822

Mar-25

GA

 

Nellie Ellena Davis born (wife of John Monroe Robinson )

 

 

 

 

 

1822

Apr-06

GA

 

Edmund O. Giles born in Georgia, location unknown.

 

 

 

 

 

1823

Jan-11

AL

Bibb County

Jane Harriet Goodgame born (mother of Henry Matison Mahan )

 

 

 

 

 

1823

Jun

AL

Perry County

Mary Scott Mahan died in Perry County where she moved following the death of her husband, John Mahan Sr., to live with her son Archimedes Monroe Mahan . (Greatx4 Grandmother of Ted Mahan)

 

 

 

 

 

1824

Jan-13

AL

Shelby County

Lettice Ann ‘Lettie’ Williams is born. (wife if Joseph Yerby Willis )

 

 

 

 

 

1827

Sep-25

AL

 

Elizabeth Robinson born (wife of Edmund O. Giles )

1826

 

AL

 

Alabama capital moved to Tuscaloosa.

1830

 

AL

Perry County

John Mahan, Jr.  family listed in Perry County with wife and five children (3 boys, 2 girls). Oldest daughter Mary was already married at this time.

1830

 

AL

 

1830 Federal Census 

Alabama population=309,527

White population=190,406

Black population=119,121

Slaves=117,549 – Free blacks=1,572

Urban=3,194 – Rural=306,333

 

 

 

 

 

1831

 

VA

 

Nat Turner slave insurrection

 

 

 

 

 

1831

Apr-13

AL

Tuscaloosa

University of Alabama formally opens its doors.

 

 

 

 

 

1832

Dec-18

AL

Coosa County

Talladega County

Coosa and Talladega Counties established out of territory acquired from the Muscogees.

 

 

 

 

 

1836

 

AL

 

Second Creek War (Seminole War); Battle of Hobdy’s Bridge last Indian battle in Alabama (1837).

1840

May-21

AL

Talladega County

John Archimedes Mahan and Jane Harriet Goodgame are married (parents of Henry Matison Mahan)

1838

May

AL

 

Alabama Indians moved to the western lands in the “Trail of Tears”

1840

Jun-02

GA

Fayette County

John Monroe Robinson and Nellie Ellena Davis are married.

1840

 

AL

Statewide

1840 Federal Census 

Alabama population=590,756

White population=335,185

Black population=255,571

Slaves=253,532 – Free blacks=2,039

Urban=12,672 – Rural=578,084

1842

May-19

MO

 

David Lillard Ford born in Missouri (Father of Prudye Ford Mahan )

 

 

 

 

 

1842

Dec-05

AL

Coosa County

Joseph Yerby Willis and Lettice Ann Williams are married.

 

 

 

 

 

1843

Nov-20

AL

Shelby County

Edmund O. Giles and Elizabeth Robinson are married.

 

 

 

 

 

1844

Apr-30

AL

Dallas County

John Henry Klinner married Rhoda Wilson.

 

 

 

 

 

1846

Jan-24

AL

Perry County

From Deed Book G, p. 686:  Jan. 24, 1846.  Exum B. Melton sold to Archimedes Mahan and Wm. S. Miree, trustees, of the neighborhood of Perryville and vicinity, for the purpose of keeping a permanent school-house at or near Perryville, for $1.00, five acres of land on the west side of the road leading from Perryville to Selma, on the line that divides the land of said Melton from the land of Alfred Fuller, with the privilege of the tanyard spring, forever. Land in Township 19, Range 9.

 

 

 

 

 

1848

 

LA

Union Parish

John Giles, father of Edmund O. Giles, moved from Bibb County, AL to Union Parish, LA at about the same time as his daughter Elizabeth Giles Agerton and her husband Holloway Agerton moved.

 

 

 

 

 

1949

 

MS

 

Indiana Shankle born in Mississippi (Mother of Prudye Ford Mahan ).

 

 

 

 

 

1849

Oct-16

AL

Chilton County

John Tyler Giles born (father of Albert Lomer Giles)

1849

 

AL

Montgomery

Capitol in Montgomery is destroyed by fire. Construction of new capitol completed in 1851.

1850

 

AL

Shelby County

1850 Shelby Census lists Edmund O. Giles , his wife Elizabeth and two oldest children Martin Leander, age 3, and John Tyler, age 1 year.

1850

 

AL

Statewide

1850 Federal Census 

Alabama population=771,623

White population=426,514

Black population=345,109

Slaves=342,844 – Free blacks=2,265

Urban=35,179 – Rural=736,444

1850

Aug-09

AL

Chilton County

Nancy Elizabeth Robinson born (mother of Albert Lomer Giles )

 

 

 

 

 

1851

Jan-03

LA

Union Parish

John Giles applied for a bounty land claim based on his service in the war against the Creek Indians in 1814-1815 in (Putnam County?) Georgia.

 

 

 

 

 

1852

May-26

MS

Corinth

Henry Matison Mahan born (father of Zediciah Robinson Mahan) 

 

 

 

 

 

1853

May-30

AL

 

Nancy Paralee Chambers born. [wife of John Franklin Klinner]

 

 

 

 

 

1853

Dec-21

AL

Chilton County

John Franklin Klinner, son of John Henry and Rhoda Wilson Klinner, born in Stanton, Chilton County.

 

 

 

 

 

1854

Nov-16

AL

Mineral Springs, Chilton County

Rachel Paraline Robinson born (daughter of John Monroe Robinson, wife of Henry Matison Mahan, mother of Zediciah Robinson Mahan)

 

 

 

 

 

1857

Jan-31

MS

Noxubee County

Jane Harriet Goodgame Mahan died (mother of Henry Matison Mahan)

 

 

 

 

 

1859

Jan-10

MS

Noxubee County

John Archimedes Mahan died (father of Henry Matison Mahan). Archimedes M. Mahan appointed guardian of his children and administrator of his estate. A.M. Mahan died in 1861, however, before the estate was probated. Both estates were probated by A.M.’s sons and sons-in-law.

1860

 

AL

Statewide

1860 Federal Census 

Alabama population=964,201

White population=526,271

Black population=437,770

Slaves=435,080 – Free blacks=2,690

Urban=48,901 – Rural=915,300

 

 

 

 

 

1861

Apr-12

SC

Charleston

Abraham Lincoln’s victory in the presidential election of 1860 triggered South Carolina’s declaration of secession from the Union. By February 1861, six more Southern states made similar declarations. The seven states formed the Confederate States of America with temporary capital at Montgomery, Alabama. The Civil War started when Confederate forces attack Fort Sumter in April, 1861.

1861

Nov-15

AL

Montgomery

William Robert White enlisted in the First Alabama Calvary Company G. He served under various confederate leaders during the four years of fighting but his most cherished memories were of President Jefferson Davis and General Joseph Wheeler. Mr. White was a member of the company which was detailed to escort Davis from Charlotte, N.C. to Washington, GA in an effort to protect him from capture which took place only a few days later. While fighting under the fiery Wheeler, Mr. White took part on many amazingly daring raids which he described with color and vividness in after years. [Selma Times Journal, 12 Oct 1936]

1861

Nov

AL

Montgomery

First Alabama Cavalry organized in Nov 1861 and ordered to TN soon after, the regiment engaged at Battle of Shiloh with slight loss. Regiment moved to KY as part of Gen. Wheeler’s command and were engaged at Perryville.  Returning to TN, Regiment fought at Murfreesboro, Chattanooga, Duck river, Chicamauga, moved into east TN with Longstreet, engaging in several battles. At some point the Second Alabama Cavalry joined Wheeler and the First for the Dalton-Atlanta campaign. The Second then tracked Sherman to Greenesboro, NC, then escorted President Davis to Georgia where, at Forsyth, the regiment laid down its arms.

1862

Mar-07

AL

Alabama

Loutish Elenor Robinson born (mother of Amry Loutish Willis)

1863

Jan-01

DC

Washington

Emancipation Proclamation, a presidential order, became effective declaring the freedom of all slaves in those areas of the Confederate States of America not already under Union control.

1864

May-28

TN

Resaca

William R. Robinson, son of John Monroe Robinson, joined the 29th Alabama Infantry and was wounded in the Battle of Resaca & captured by Union forces. Sent to US Hospital in Nashville, TN where he underwent an amputation, but died about 2 weeks later due to loss of blood.

1862

Feb

AL

 

29th Alabama Infantry was organized at Pensacola in Feb. 1862 and remained there till it was evacuated, suffering much from diseases that usually afflict raw troops. Then lay between Pollard & Pensacola for over a year be fore being ordered to Mobile for almost a year. The regiment then joined the Army of TN at Resaca, in time to initiate the Atlanta-Dalton campaign. The 29th was engaged at the battle of Resaca with a loss of about 100 killed & wounded, out of 1100 men engaged.

1865

Feb-15

AL

Shelby County

Joseph Yerby Willis, Jr. born (father of Amry Loutish Willis)

1863

Jul 1-3

PA

Gettysburg

Battle of Gettysburg was bloodiest battle of the American Civil War with Union Major General George G. Meade’s army defeating attacks by Confederate General Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia, ending Lee’s invasion of the North.

1865

Apr-01

AL

Chilton County – Dallas County

John Henry Klinner fought in the Battle of Ebenezer Church which took place near his home and close to present-day Stanton. Legacies tell that Rhoda and the children witnessed the fighting since the action took near their home. The next day, April 02, John Henry fought in the Battle of Selma and became very sick. He went home only to die a short time afterward.

1865

Dec

GA

 

Robert E. Lee surrendered, ending the Civil War

1865

Dec-2

AL

 

Thirteenth Amendment is ratified by Alabama, abolishing slavery.

1865

Dec-6

 

 

Ratification of Thirteenth Amendment is completed, abolishing slavery throughout the country.

1865

Jul-22

GA

Atlanta

William Robert White wounded when a bullet went through the fleshy part of his thigh in the battle of Atlanta on July 22, 1865. This did not cause him to withdraw from active fighting.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1868

Feb

 

 

Reconstruction Constitution ratified gaining Alabama readmission to the Union and allowing black suffrage for first time.

 

 

 

 

 

1868

Dec-30

AL

Baker County

Baker County established with its county seat at Grantville, located about 2.5 miles northeast of present-day Clanton.

1870

 

AL

Baker County

1870 Baker Census lists Edward [Edmund O.] Giles , age 49, wife Elizabeth, age 42, and eight children ranging in age from 2 years to 20 years. John Tyler the oldest living at home at age 20 was listed as working on his father’s farm.

1870

Jan

AL

 

First Court House of Baker County, a log structure built by Andrew Jackson Cooper, burned in early January. All County records were lost. Oldest marriage record for Baker County was on January 12, 1870.

 

 

 

 

 

1870

 

AL

Statewide

1870 Federal Census 

Alabama population=996,992

White population=521,384

Black population=475,510

Urban=62,700 – Rural=934,292

 

 

 

 

 

1870

Dec

AL

Chilton County

Jemison first established as Langston Station of the South & North Alabama Railroad. Name was changed to “Jamison” on 05 Sep 1873, then to “Jemison” in Feb 1888, next to “Bristol” on 15 Mar 1890, and finally back to “Jemison” in the late 1890’s.

 

 

 

 

 

1871

 

AL

Birmingham

Birmingham founded; evolves into center of Southern iron and steel industry.

 

 

 

 

 

1874

Dec-17

AL

Chilton County

Baker County renamed Chilton County in honor of Judge William Parish Chilton, Chief Justice of the Alabama Supreme Court and a member of the provisional and regular Congress of the Confederacy. Clanton was originally named “Goose Pond” until 1871 when it was renamed Clanton after Confederate General James Holt Clanton (1827-1871) who was murdered in Birmingham while on business and is buried in Montgomery’s oldest cemetery.

 

 

 

 

 

1876

Mar-10

MA

Boston

Alexander Graham Bell invented the telephone.

1877

Aug-12

AL

Chilton County

Henry Matison Mahan and Rachel Paraline Robinson are married (parents of Zediciah Robinson Mahan)

1877

Jan-21

AL

Chilton County

Earthquake in Clanton at 7:40 a.m. causing slight damage to the area.

1878

Mar-05

AL

Chilton County

John Tyler Giles and Nancy Elizabeth Robinson are married (parents of Albert Lomer Giles)

 

 

 

 

 

1878

Mar-09

AL

Chilton County

Coy Jefferson Klinner, son of John Franklin and Nancy Chambers Klinner, born in Chilton County.

 

 

 

 

 

1879

Nov-11

AL

 

Mary Edna White, daughter of William Robert White and Martha Annette Blount White, born (location unknown) [wife of Coy Jefferson Klinner ]

 

 

 

 

 

1880

 

AL

Clanton, Chilton County

1880 Chilton County census lists Edmond Giles , age 57, with his wife Elizabeth, age 52, and four children.

1880

 

AL

Statewide

1880 Federal Census 

Alabama population=1,262,505

White population=662,185

Black population=600,103

Urban=68,518 – Rural=1,193,987

1880

 

AL

Chilton County

1880 Chilton County census lists John Tyler Giles , age 30, with his wife Nancy E. Robinson Giles, age 20. Census place listed as Mims Cross Roads.

1880

 

Al

Montgomery

National Baptist Convention (African-American Baptists) organized at Montgomery.

1881

Jul-24

AL

Chilton County

Zuliemer Abigail Giles born. (daughter of John Tyler & Elizabeth Robinson Giles)

 

 

 

 

 

1883

Apr-22

AL

Clanton, Chilton County

Zediciah Robinson Mahan born. (father of Travis E. Mahan).

 

 

 

 

 

1884

Mar-27

AL

Chilton County

Albert Lomer Giles born. (son of John Tyler & Elizabeth Robinson Giles)

1883

Oct-11

AL

Chilton County

Notice to Maimed Confederate Soldiers: Judge of Probate has warrants for your annual pension of $17.96 for you.

1884

Dec-08

TX

Surry, Kaufman County

Prudye Myrtle Fordborn (mother of Travis E. Mahan) in Kaufman County, TX

 

 

 

 

 

1886

Jul-25

AL

Chilton County

Edmund O. Giles died (father of John Tyler Giles)

1889

Dec-12

AL

Chilton County

[From The Chilton View] Last week Capt. W. A. Smith of Dixie purchased the Mineral Springs property in Beat One from Messrs. Richard Coe of Stanton and Daniel Partridge of Selma. There is on the property a bold beautiful spring, strongly impregnated with mineral gushing out of the white pebbles…A large hotel is planned to work into a health resort to be finished by next summer.

1887

Aug-02

AL

Shelby County

Joseph Yerby Willis, Jr. and Loutish Elenor Robinson are married.

1888

 

AL

Shelby County

Lettice Ann Williams died.

 

 

 

 

 

1890

 

AL

Statewide

1890 Federal Census 

Alabama population=1,513,401

White population=833,718

Black population=678,489

Urban=152,235 – Rural=1,361,166

1892

 

AL

Shelby County

Joseph Yerby Willis died.

1893

Feb-22

AL

Birmingham

First Auburn/Alabama football game played in Birmingham’s Lakeview Park before a crowd of 5,000 spectators. Auburn won this first match-up 32-33.

1894

Jul-13

AL

Shelby County

Amry Loutish Willis born.

1896

 

AL

Chilton County

Town of Thorsby founded.

1898

Mar-24

AL

Chilton County

John Monroe Robinson died.

1899

Jan-27

AL

Chilton County

Record snow fall covered Chilton County.

1900

 

 

Chilton County

1900 Chilton County Census lists John T. Giles , age 50, and wife Nancy, age 49, living in Clanton with Zuliemer, age 18, and Albert L., age 16.

1899

Feb-05

AL

Chilton County

A cyclone hit Thorsby at 3:00 a.m., demolishing two homes and also causing a great deal of damage to the Collins Chapel community.

 

 

 

 

 

1900

 

AL

Statewide

1900 Federal Census 

Alabama population=1,828,687

White population=1,001,152

Black population=827,307

Urban=216,714 – Rural=1,611,983

 

 

 

 

 

1900

Jun-14

AL

 

Shoultz: We deeply regret that a man in our community broke the Sabbath Sunday by setting out potato plants after the rain. We pray that he will repent and that sin like this does not happen here again.

1903

Mar-25

AL

Chilton County

Nellie Ellena Davis Robinson died (wife of John Monroe Robinson)

1901

 

AL

Chilton County

Thorsby, founded in 1896, is incorporated early in the year. First meeting of officials 18 Mar 1901.

1903

May-30

AL

Shelby County

Loutish Elenor Robinson Willis died. (mother of Amry Willis Giles)

1901

Jan-12

AL

Chilton County

A $200 reward was offered for the arrest of the person or persons who broke into the Chilton County Court House and blew up the County safe on 25 Nov 1900.

1903

 

AL

Chilton County

Enzo Franklin Klinner, son of Coy Jefferson and Mary White Klinner, born in Chilton County, exact date not known.

1903

Dec-17

 

 

Wright Brothers first successful flight in self-powered airplane.

1904

Jun-11

AL

 

Elizabeth Robinson Giles died (wife of Edmund O. Giles, mother of John Tyler Giles)

 

 

 

 

 

1904

Apr-24

TX

Kaufman County

Zediciah Robinson Mahan and Prudye Myrtle Ford married in Kaufman County, TX (parents of Travis “Ted” Mahan)

 

 

 

 

 

1904

Sep-04

AL

Chilton County

Josephine Giles, daughter of Hardy Winder Giles and Sylvania Green Giles, born in Pletcher. [wife of Enzo Franklin Klinner]

1904

Sep-15

AL

Chilton County

First automobile comes to Clanton from Montgomery, continuing on to Jemison. The people stayed at Central Hotel that night, resuming the trip to Birmingham the next morning. Trip from Montgomery to Birmingham consumed on the best part of two days.

1905

 

AL

Chilton County

George Ervin Brown and Zuliemer Abigail Giles married by Squire J.J. McDowell at his residence at Poplar Springs.

 

 

 

 

 

1906

Dec-18

AL

Chilton County

Rachel Robinson Mahan died at her home at Cane Creek; she left a husband and five children. (wife of Henry Mahan, mother of Zediciah Robinson Mahan, Grandmother of Ted Mahan)

1907

Mar-28

AL

Chilton County

Confederate Pension rate this year: First Class will receive $100, Second Class $80, Third Class $64, and Fourth Class $50, Payment is for the full Calendar Year of 1907.

1907

Dec-23

AL

Shelby County

Joseph Yerby Willis, Jr.died. (father of Amry Willis Giles)

1910

 

AL

Statewide

1910 Federal Census 

Alabama population=2,138,093

White population=1,228,832

Black population=908,282

Urban=370,431 – Rural=1,767,662

1910

 

AL

Chilton County

1910 Chilton County census lists John Giles , age 60, living in Clanton with his Wife Nancy E., age 59, and son Lomer A., age 26.

1910

Jun-23

AL

Chilton County

Wiley Young was hanged, about 300 gathered to watch the execution at the Clanton Jail.

1910

Dec-20

AL

Chilton County

Obediah G. Mahan, son of Henry Matison Mahan, was killed while working at Mr. O.E. Latham’s Saw Mill.

1912

May-11

AL

Chilton County

Tornado hit Providence in Beat 16 Saturday night. Summary of damage: 3 homes were a total loss, one was badly damaged; one pine tree left in 80 acres of virgin timber; one wagon, one buggy and one horse destroyed. [The Banner]

1912

Oct-12

AL

Clanton, Chilton County

Albert Lomer Giles and Amry Loutish Willis are married.

1912

Jun-27

AL

Chilton County

Price of cotton is up to eleven cents per pound. [The Banner]

2913

Nov-1

AL

Chilton County

John Cecil Giles, son of Lomer and Amry Giles, born in Clanton.

1912

Sep-19

AL

Chilton County

The body of former Sheriff Charley Cox was exhumed by court order for the purpose of ascertaining the position of his fingers on his right hand. He was alleged to have held a pistol. The right hand was cut from the body and then the body was returned to the grave. [The Banner]

 

 

 

 

 

1912

Dec-12

AL

Chilton County

Ed Martin was found not guilty of murder on grounds of self-defense for his murder of Charlie Cox; the dead man’s hand won the case!

 

 

 

 

 

1914

Jan-08

AL

Chilton County

Two complete blocks of the town of Thorsby were destroyed by fire, loss is estimated at $65,000. [The Banner]

1915

Aug-05

AL

Chilton County

Mary Louise Giles, daughter of Lomer and Amry Giles, born in Clanton, AL.

1914

Jul-28

 

 

Beginning of World War I – Austro-Hungarian Empire declared war on Serbia on 28 Jul 1914 and began bombing Belgrade the next day. Russia started mobilizing its army and Germany responded by invading Belgium and France. This forced Britain to intervene on the side of the allies.

1915

Nov-08

AL

Mobile County

Travis Exel Mahan, son of Zed and Prudye Mahan, born in Mobile, AL.

1915

Jan-30

AL

Chilton County

At 3:00 a.m., the Palmer Hotel in Clanton was found to be on fire and in a few minutes the Davis Hotel, a few yards west of the Palmer was also afire, and back of the Palmer House the old Episcopal Church was also a mass of flames. Within 3 hours these 3 buildings were consumed. Total loss $20,000.

1917

Jul-26

AL

Chilton County

Edna Mae Cleckler born in Clanton. [wife of John Cecil Giles ]

1917

Feb-23

AL

Coosa County

Tornado killed 11 people in Coosa County on this Friday afternoon.

 

 

 

 

 

1917

Apr-06

 

 

United States declared war on Germany after German submarines attacked several American merchant ships, sinking three. In December 1917 the U.S. declared war on Austria-Hungary as well.

1917

Dec-16

AL

Chilton County

Sadie Willis born in Chilton County, daughter of Martin & Virgie Willis.

1917

Oct-11

AL

Autauga County

There are still 81 Civil War Veterans living at the Old Soldier’s Home in Mountain Creek, ages range from 71 to 91.

 

 

 

 

 

1918

Jan-05

AL

Chilton County

A cyclone did much damage in Clanton on this Saturday.

1918

Sep-12

AL

Walker County

Zediciah Robinson “Zed” Mahan registered for the World War I draft in Gorgas. He was working for Alabama Power Company as a Boiler Room Foreman at the time.

1918

Nov-11

 

 

World War I ends – ceasefire implemented and opposing armies on Western front began to withdraw. Formal end to the war came on June 28, 1919 with the signing of the Treaty of Versailles.

 

 

 

 

 

1919

 

U.S.

 

Eighteenth Amendment to U.S. Constitution bans manufacture and sale of alcoholic beverages.

1920

 

AL

Chilton County

1920 Alabama census lists Albert L. Giles , age 36, living with wife Amry Lou, age 25, son Cecil, age 6, and daughter Louise, age 4.

1920

 

AL

Statewide

1920 Federal Census 

Alabama population=2,348,174

White population=1,447,031

Black population=900,652

Urban=509,317 – Rural=1,838,857

1920

Nov-29

AL

Chilton County

Oscar Clifton Willis born in Chilton County, son of Edgar Clifton & Emma Willis.

1920

 

U.S.

 

Nineteenth Amendment to U.S. Constitution grants women the right to vote.

1921

Jan-13

AL

Chilton County

Eunice Willis born in Chilton County, daughter of Martin & Virgie Willis.

1921

Jul-21

AL

Chilton County

Clanton reported as now having electric power from Lock 12. [The Banner]

1922

Mar-14

AL

Walker County

Albert Lomer Giles, Jr., son of Lomer and Amry Giles, born in Gorgas.

1922

Feb-09

AL

Chilton County

Clanton Post Office burned and was a total loss.

 

 

 

 

 

1922

Mar-09

AL

Chilton County

New Central Alabama Hospital in Clanton is now open. [The Banner]

1923

Apr-29

AL

Chilton County

Henry Matison Mahan died suddenly on Sunday. He fell dead in his yard at age 72; had been married three times and was the father of 11 children, burial was at Clanton City Cemetery. (father of Zediciah Robinson Mahan)

1923

Jan-18

AL

Chilton County

New touring 4-door Ford that gets 33.8 miles per gallon of gas offered for sale at Polk Brothers for $490.

1923

Jul-01

AL

Autauga County

Holland Douglas Mahan, age 5, son of Zediciah R. Mahan , died Sunday; burial at Clanton City Cemetery.

1923

Feb-01

AL

Chilton County

Mr. Link Durbin was killed by a train at the Jemison crossing. The north-bound train hit and destroyed his wagon and killed him, but his mule was not hurt. [The Banner]

1923

Aug-11

AL

Chilton County

Byrdie Loutish “Lucy” Willis born, daughter of Edgar Clifton & Emma Willis.

1923

Jul-12

AL

 

State announces that a total of 105 whiskey stills have been found and destroyed in the State during the month of June. [The Banner]

 

 

 

 

 

1923

Sep-27

AL

 

The State of Alabama has adopted electrocution method for the execution of death sentences to replace hanging as the method

 

 

 

 

 

1924

May-22

AL

Chilton County

New 4-door Ford car, special sale price of $295 in Clanton.

1924

nov-14

AL

Chilton County

Martin Joseph “Rocky” Willis, Jr. born in Chilton County

1924

Oct-28

AL

Chilton County

Electric stoves offered to the public by Alabama Power for $16.01.

1925

Sep-19

AL

Chilton County

Eugene Calvin Willis born, son of Edgar Clifton & Emma Willis

1925

Jan

AL

Chilton County

Highway 31 to be paved from Lomax to Mountain Creek, a distance of 17.5 miles at a cost of half a million dollars. Clanton to pave ¾ miles of streets in Business section of town at a cost of $36,200.

1926

Jan-09

AL

Walker County

Joseph Wilburn Giles, son of Lomer and Amry Giles, born in Gorgas.

1926

May-27

AL

Chilton County

Mr. J. Mell Martin bought a combination ambulance and funeral car in Chattanooga this week. This will be the first Motor Transport of sick and first Motor Funeral Vehicle in the County. [The Banner]

1927

Jul-24

AL

Chilton County

Mrs. Nancy [Elizabeth Robinson] Giles died in Clanton Sunday morning, wife of Uncle John Giles, she was almost 78 years old. Burial was at Mineral Springs, she was the daughter of John and Nellie Robinson.

1927

Jul-28

AL

Chilton County

“Let those live who want to live, and let those die who want to die.” Gladys Hayes, 21 year old school teacher wrote these words and wrapped herself in quilts she had saturated with kerosene and set herself on fire and was burned beyond recognition, both feet and hands were totally consumed. She was the daughter of Madison Hayes and had taught school for two years. [no known relation to the Russell Hayes family]

 

 

 

 

 

1927

Aug-11

AL

Chilton County

A move is on to build a Baptist Church near the Mineral Springs Cemetery to be called Mineral Springs Baptist Church. [The Union Banner]

 

 

 

 

 

1927

Sep-01

AL

Chilton County

Gold mine found on Ben Childress place west of Thorsby.

1928

Jul-31

AL

 Chilton County

William Ralph Giles, son of Lomer and Amry Giles, born in Clanton.

1928

Jun-28

AL

Chilton County

A. C. Boswell grew a turnip that weighed 8 pounds.

1829

Feb-21

AL

Chilton County

Joseph Abram “Joe” Willis born in Chilton County.

1929

Mar-19

AL

Chilton County

Uncle Jim Baker died in Clanton. This former slave was here before Clanton was established and his delight was to clean and sweep this town like it was his prized jewel. He remembered being sold on a block. He was loved by Clanton. Burial at Hopewell Cemetery (Gravestone: Rev. Jim Baker) [The Union Banner]

 

 

 

 

 

1929

Jun-13

AL

Chilton County

Banks here are showing new paper money. Smaller bills will begin to circulate here about July 10th.

 

 

 

 

 

1929

Aug-09

AL

Chilton County

Is the report of oil well at Jemison to prove a Boom?? [The Union Banner]

1929

Sep-16

AL

Chilton County

Enzo Franklin Klinner, Jr., son of Enzo Franklin and Josephine Giles Klinner, born in Maplesville.

1929

Oct-29

NY

New York

Black Tuesday – stock market crashes, major factor in causing the Great Depression which lasted through most of the 1930’s.

 

 

 

 

 

1930

 

AL

Statewide

1930 Federal Census 

Alabama population=2,646,248

White population=1,700,844

Black population=944,834

Urban=744,273 – Rural=1,901,975

 

 

 

 

 

1930

May-01

AL

Chilton County

Confederate Pension Persons: In 1929 there were 1,537 Confederate Veterans on the Pension Rolls of Alabama; that number dropped to 1,221 in 1930. The total of Veterans and Widows was 6,388 in 1929; this dropped to 5,668 in 1930.

1930

July-29

AL

Chilton County

Estelle Marie “Stella” Willis born, daughter of Edgar Clifton & Emma Willis.

1930

May-31

AL

Chilton County

Thorsby Hotel was destroyed by fire. [The Union Banner]

 

 

 

 

 

1930

Sep-04

AL

Chilton County

Men’s broadcloth dress shirts by Arrow are 95 cents each at Capitol Dry Goods in Clanton. V.J. Elmore advertises Men’s heavy best Duck Head overalls sizes 32 to 44 at 63 cents per pair. [The Union Banner].

 

 

 

 

 

1930

Oct-09

AL

Chilton County

Collins Chapel plans to build a new Brick Church building. [Union Banner]

 

 

 

 

 

1931

Jan-08

AL

Chilton County

An airplane will be here at Dudley Collins farm on Lay Dam Road until Sunday for folk to see. Rides are available at very reasonable rates. Will land and take off in Mr. Collins cow pasture.  [The Union Banner]

 

 

 

 

 

1931

Mar-12

AL

Chilton County

Schools are out of money, will be forced to close shortly. [The Union Banner]

 

 

 

 

 

1931

Apr-16

AL

Chilton County

Schools must close this week, out of funds, no credit. [The Union Banner]

1931

Jul-20

AL

Chilton County

Betty Jean Giles, daughter of Lomer and Amry Giles, born in Clanton.

1931

May-05

AL

Chilton County

Slight earthquake tremor was in Clanton at 6:17 last Tuesday. Last time this happened was October 1916, and a much greater one was in January 1877. The one in 1877 did slight property damage in Verbena. [The Union Banner]

 

 

 

 

 

1932

Jan-14

AL

Chilton County

Clanton has a traffic light! WE HAVE ARRIVED! It was installed at the inner section [sic] of Second Avenue and 7th Street, called Upchurch Corner. [The Union Banner]

 

 

 

 

 

1932

Mar-21

AL

Chilton County

Greatest weather disaster ever for Alabama—line of killer tornadoes swept across the State destroying 7000 homes & businesses, injuring 1,874 and killing 268 (some newspapers listed the dead at around 300 with injuries of 2,500 to 3,000). In Chilton County, 228 homes and buildings were destroyed, injuring 273 people and killing 58; 1,100 people received emergency relief. Union Grove was laid to waste; doctors and nurses from Montgomery and Birmingham worked all night by lantern and flashlight to relieve the suffering. Less than a week later a second tornado hit in almost the same area, killing 50 people. Hardest hit were Thorsby, Union Grove and Stanton (where seven members of the same family were killed.

1932

 

AL

Chilton County

When schools closed in Chilton County due to lack of funds, Travis “Ted” Mahan went to work in his uncle’s cabinet shop finishing only the 10th grade.

1932

Apr-10

AL

Chilton County

All schools closed due to lack of funds. This resulted in some students, especially male students, never finishing their high school education.

 

 

 

 

 

1932

Jun-02

AL

Chilton County

Official death toll in Alabama for March tornado is 211. [The Union Banner]

 

 

 

 

 

1932

Jun-16

AL

Chilton County

The cost of mailing a letter will go up from 2 cents to 3 cents on July 6, 1932. Hurry and get your letters mailed! [The Union Banner]

 

 

 

 

 

1932

Jul-02

AL

Chilton County

Plans are ready to pave Lay Dam Road. [The Union Banner]

1932

Nov-23

AL

Chilton County

James Edward “Ed” Willis born in Chilton County; son of Martin & Virgie Willis.

1932

Sep-01

AL

Chilton County

Attendance at Sunday School last Sunday at Clanton Baptist Church was 683. [The Union Banner]

 

 

 

 

 

1933

Jan-07

AL

Chilton County

Five schools did not open after Christmas Holidays, Clanton Grammar School, Thorsby Public School, Jemison Elementary, Verbena Elementary, and Maplesville Elementary. They have completed only 3 ½ months of the school year but there are no funds available for complete school year.

1933

Mar-02

AL

Chilton County

James Royce Giles, son of Lomer and Amry Giles, born in Clanton.

1933

Mar-09

AL

Chilton County

Banks of Clanton are considered stable. All banks operations became greatly restricted by Federal Government on March 7 due to the failure of so many banks in this time of great panic depression…A 30% acreage reduction is required to secure crop loans…Probate Office took in a total of 25 cents in fees on Monday. This is a fair day in this time of panic. [The Union Banner]

 

 

 

 

 

1933

Mar-16

AL

Chilton County

No gold bullion, gold coins, or gold certificates can be withdrawn from Banks. There is very limited amount of cash withdrawal to prohibit hoarding in our Panic Crisis…Banks were all closed by order of Federal Government March 1st. Clanton Banks re-opened for business on March 15th. [The Union Banner]

 

 

 

 

 

1933

Mar-23

AL

Chilton County

A big cut in pensions for War Veterans, many cut 50% or more, put into immediate effect by Federal Government in Crisis Depression. [The Union Banner]

 

 

 

 

 

1933

Aug-31

AL

Chilton County

Plans approved to pave Road 22 from Clanton to Selma. [The Union Banner]

1934

 

AL

Chilton County

John Cecil Giles and Edna Mae Cleckler married.

1934

Jan-11

AL

Chilton County

High Schools will run eight months this year, other schools six months due to available funds.

 

 

 

 

 

1934

Feb-22

AL

Chilton County

State has allocated $35,000 to pave three miles of Road 22 toward Selma from Clanton.

 

 

 

 

 

1934

Apr-19

AL

Chilton County

Veterans are to get their pay restored soon according to an announcement from Washington. During the Depression Crisis many pensions were cut off entirely and others were reduced 50% or more. April 30, those cut off and those reduced will be restored to their former pension amounts. [The Union Banner]

 

 

 

 

 

1934

Jul-05

AL

Chilton County

Mrs. J. L. Scroggins of West End wants to do sewing for the public. Ladies print dresses made and fitted for 35 cents each, ladies voiles made and fitted by 45 cents each, men’s pants made and fitted for 45 cents per pair. [The Union Banner]

 

 

 

 

 

1934

Oct-18

AL

Chilton County

Tax Crisis: County Tax Collector has announced some 300 homes, farms, lands and places of business, listed to be sold for past due taxes. More than one third of the listings is for tax amounts of less than $15. One farm listed for tax sale is 40 acres and the past due tax is $4.03. Tragic results of the Panic Depression. The following week The Union Banner listed many more farms to be sold for past due taxes. In December 1934 the paper reported that a survey shows that almost 1/6 of the total U.S. population is currently on Welfare Relief Rolls.

 

 

 

 

 

1934

Dec-06

AL

Chilton County

Safe was stolen from Alabama Power Company and hauled away to the railroad and then cut and blown open and robbed. No arrest. [The Union Banner]

 

 

 

 

 

1935

Jan-31

AL

Chilton County

Prof. G.G. Williams left an Indian Potato with the Banner that weighs 29 ¾ pounds, is 38 inches long, 25 ¼ inches around. It grew on a farm of Mr. Trull Smith of the Evergreen Community in Autauga County. It grew in hard clay and was about 12 inches from the top of the ground. It is something called hog potato by some and it grows wild. Vines look like regular sweet potato. No one has yet been able to find a use for this but an effort is being made to see if it can be turned into cow feed. [The Union Banner]

1935

Feb-19

AL

Chilton County

William Jackson “Bill” Willis born in Chilton County, son of Martin & Virgie Willis.

1935

Feb-26

AL

Chilton County

Chilton County voted Dry by some more than 900 votes than the Wets. [The Union Banner]

 

 

 

 

 

1935

Mar-21

AL

Chilton County

Hookworm Survey of all schools of the County shows that over 33% of the Children tested positive. [The Union Banner]

 

 

 

 

 

1935

Nov-07

AL

Chilton County

Clanton recently took a local census. The town has 3,363 people. The ratio of 3 Whites to 1 Black. [The Union Banner]

 

 

 

 

 

1936

Jan-02

AL

Chilton County

Supt. Luther E. Little announced due to Funds Crises schools may have to close February 1st. Two weeks later it was announced that County schools would close February 14th due to no funds. The closing was then moved to February 21st.

 

 

 

 

 

1936

Apr-09

AL

Chilton County

C.W. Wade opens new theatre here April 15th. [The Union Banner]

1936

Jun-13

AL

Chilton County

Patricia Ann Giles, daughter and first child of Cecil and Edna Giles, born in Chilton County.

1936

May-10

AL

Chilton County

Family reunion at the home of Mrs. A. V. Klinner. Several Klinners, Roebucks, Williams, Adams, and others who attended are listed in The Union Banner May 14th edition.

 

 

 

 

 

1936

Jul-16

AL

Chilton County

The Alabama Press Association is sponsoring a week long trip to Havana, Cuba, leaving August 15th from Montgomery to Miami by train; Miami to Havana by steam ship, 5 full days in Havana; total expenses including all hotel rooms, meals, tips and charges is $73.70 round trip. [The Union Banner]

1936

Oct-19

AL

Chilton County

William Robert White, age 93, hero of the Confederacy died Monday at the home of his son, E.M. White of Selma.

1936

Aug-06

AL

Chilton County

Chilton County Medical Society issued a signed statement by 6 medical doctors asking for a ban on all gatherings for children under 16 years of age due to the critical epidemic of Infantile Paralysis. [The Union Banner]

 

 

 

 

 

1937

Jan-07

AL

Chilton County

Union Banner now has a “funny paper,” a colored section of 8 pages at this time.

 

 

 

 

 

1937

Mar-11

AL

Chilton County

The use of Alabama Sales Tax Tokens began March 1st. A total of 10,000,000 tokens were available when the tax became effective. The general public seems to share the same opinion of the tokens as they do to Castor Oil. [The Union Banner]

1938

Mar-16

AL

Chilton County

Wilma Sue Giles, daughter and second child of Cecil and Edna Giles, born in Chilton County.

1937

Jun-10

AL

Chilton County

The first electric permanent wave machine was installed at Ideal Beauty Shop owned by Mr. Tom Parrish last week. [The Union Banner]

1938

Apr-24

AL

Tuscaloosa

Travis Exel Mahan and Mary Louise Giles  were married, both at age 23.

1937

Aug-26

AL

Chilton County

H.J. Taylor killed a big Moccasin Snake at Coopers and wanted to see what made the snake so big around and he mashed out 44 little 10” moccasins that were each capable of a fatal strike. [The Union Banner]

1939

Sep

AL

Chilton County

Doris Louise Giles, daughter and third child of Cecil and Edna Giles, born in Chilton County.

1939

Sep-01

 

 

World War II began when Germany invaded Poland. The United Kingdom and France responded by declaring war on Germany.

 

 

 

 

 

1939

Oct-29

AL

Chilton County

Mineral Springs Sanatorium opened. People from all areas of Alabama and nearby states came for a variety of ailments and were treated by Dr. Marshall Price.

 

 

 

 

 

1939

Oct-31

AL

Mountain Creek

Alabama Confederate Soldiers Home closed by act of the Alabama Legislature.

 

 

 

 

 

1939

Dec-15

GA

Atlanta

Movie Gone With the Wind premiered in Atlanta to advance-ticket road show engagements; went into general release in 1941.

 

 

 

 

 

1940

 

AL

Statewide

1940 Federal Census 

Alabama population=2,832,961

White population=1,849,097

Black population=983,290

Urban=855,941 – Rural=1,977,020

1941

Jul-06

KY

Louisville

Sondra Sue Mahan, daughter of Ted and Louise Mahan, born in Louisville, KY where Ted was working at the time.

1941

Dec-07

HI

Pearl Harbor

Japan launched an air attack on Pearl Harbor; the following day 08 Dec 1941 the U.S. declared war on Japan. On 11 Dec, Germany declared war on the United States. Dr. Samuel Earl Johnson of Chilton County was killed in the Japanese attach on Pearl Harbor (12-19-1941 date of death)

1942

Mar-16

AL

Chilton County

John Dewey Giles, first son and fourth child of Cecil and Edna Giles, born in Chilton County.

1941

 

AL

Tuskegee

Training of African-American military pilots, the Tuskegee Airmen, underway

1943

Sep-03

AL

Chilton County

Albert Lomer Giles, Jr. and Mildred Pauline Trail were married.

 

 

 

 

 

1944

Jul-29

AL

Chilton County

Donald Paul Giles, son of Albert Lomer and Mildred Trail Giles, Jr., born (location unknown).

1944

May-27

AL

Chilton County

Old CCC Camp opens as Clanton POW facility for German prisoners (capacity 250), a satellite of the much larger camp at Aliceville, Pickens County (capacity 6,000)

1944

Sep-28

AL

Mobile

Joseph Wilburn Giles, son Lomer and Amry Giles, died of spinal meningitis caused when he went swimming and dirty water leaked through a perforation in his ear drum, causing a sub-dural abscess which ruptured and went into his spinal column causing the spinal meningitis.

1944

Jun-06

 

Normandy, France

“D-Day”, the western Allies composed of the United States, United Kingdom and Canada invaded German-held Normandy.

1945

Dec-06

AL

Chilton County

John Archimedes ‘Arkie’ Mahan, age 67, Clanton Business Man was killed and Albert Pounds, age 40, suffered a severe head injury on Highway 22, 13 miles east of Clanton Thursday afternoon when the brakes failed on the heavily loaded lumber truck in which they were riding. Mr. Mahan has been in the lumber business some years. He is survived by his wife, two sons, Luby and Roy D., one daughter, two brothers and two sisters. Burial Clanton City Cemetery. [Union Banner, December 13, 1945]

1945

May-02 Sep-02

 

 

World War II ends – German forces in Berlin and Italy surrendered on May 2, 1945; by May 12 all German forces had surrendered. On 6 August 1945, the U.S. dropped a nuclear bomb on Heroshima, followed on 9 August 1945 by dropping a second atomic bomb on Nagasaki. The Japanese surrendered on 14 August 1945, signing the surrender agreement on 02 September.

1946

Oct-03

AL

Ft. McClellan

Enzo Franklin Klinner, Jr. enlisted in the U.S. Army Air Corps as a Private.

1945

Jul-05

AL

Chilton County

Chilton County has 206 German prisoners of war at the site of the Old CCC Camp on Highway 22 in Clanton. The POW Camp closed on 11 SEP 1945.

1947

Jun-22

AL

Chilton County

Nancy Elizabeth Giles, daughter of Albert Lomer and Mildred Trail Giles, Jr., born (location unknown)

 

 

 

 

 

1947

Jul-06

AL

Chilton County

Linda Louise Mahan, daughter of Ted and Louise Mahan, born in Clanton, AL

 

 

 

 

 

1948

Apr-02

AL

Chilton County

Infant Giles, fifth child of Cecil and Edna Giles, born dead in Chilton County.

1950

 

AL

Statewide

1950 Federal Census 

Alabama population=3,061,743

White population=2,079,591

Black population=979,617

Urban=1,228,209 – Rural=1,833,534

1951

Nov-03

 

 

Gregory Wade Giles, son of Albert Lomer and Mildred Trail Giles, Jr., born (location unknown)

1950

Jun-25

 

 

Korean War began – started as a civil war between North Korea and South Korea but escalated into a multinational conflict when North Korea launched a massive invasion of the South.

1952

May-05

GA

Fort Benning

Enzo Franklin Klinner, Jr. graduated from the Infantry School; he was selected as a Distinguished Graduate of the Army Officer Candidate Class and appointed a Second Lieutenant, Infantry in the U.S. Army.

 

 

 

 

 

1952

May-10

MS

Meridian

Enzo Franklin Klinner, Jr. and Betty Jean Giles are married.

 

 

 

 

 

1953

Feb

 

Korea

Lt. Enzo Franklin Klinner, Jr. arrived in Korea and was assigned to the 38th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division.

1953

Jul-27

 

 

Korean War ends

1953

Aug-03

AL

Chilton County

Jeffrey Allen Klinner, son of Enzo Franklin and Betty Giles Klinner, Jr., born in Clanton.

 

 

 

 

 

1953

Oct-14

 

 

David Joseph Giles, son of Albert Lomer and Mildred Trail Giles, Jr., born (location unknown)

1954

 

U.S.

 

U.S. Supreme Court decides in Brown v. Board of Education that “separate” schools cannot be equal.

1954

Oct-02

AL

Chilton County

Allen Christopher Giles, second son and sixth child of Cecil and Edna Giles, born in Chilton County.

1955

Dec-1

AL

Montgomery

Rosa Parks refuses to give up her seat on bus, sparking Montgomery Bus Boycott. In 1956 U.S. Supreme Court rules against segregated seating on buses.

1956

Nov-29

VA

Ft. Belvoir

Gina Maria Klinner, daughter of Enzo Franklin and Betty Giles Klinner, Jr., born in Ft. Belvoir, VA.

1957

 

 

Russia

Soviet satellite “SPUTNIK” launched to begin “Space Race.”

1960

Oct-03

FL

St. Petersburg

Sondra Sue Mahan and Stanley Joseph Amber are wed in Florida where Stan in stationed in the Air Force.

1959

 

 

 

American troops became involved in the Vietnam conflict in 1959, but not in large numbers until 1965.

 1960

Oct-13

NC

Ft. Bragg

Nathan Franklin Klinner, son of Enzo Franklin and Betty Giles Klinner, Jr., born at Ft. Bragg, NC.

 

 

 

 

 

1961

Sep-10

FL

Tampa

Keith Randall Amber , son and first child of Stan and Sondra Amber, born in Florida where Stan was stationed in the Air Force.

 

 

 

 

 

1963

Feb-28

GER

 

Enzo Franklin Klinner, Jr. promoted to Major in the U.S. Army.

1963

 

AL

Birmingham

George Wallace inaugurated as Governor. Birmingham bombings of Civil Rights-related targets. Governor Wallace blocks door of U. of Alabama protesting federally forced racial integration. Martin Luther King, Jr. issues “Letter from Birmingham Jail.”

1963

Aug-30

GER

Munich

Amy Suzanne Klinner, daughter of Enzo Franklin and Betty Giles Klinner, Jr., born in Munich, Germany where her father was stationed while serving in the Army.

1963

Nov-22

TX

Dallas

John F. Kennedy assassinated while riding in a motorcade through Dallas.

1967

May-30

AL

Chilton County

Albert Lomer Giles died.

1965

Mar-7

AL

Selma

600 demonstrators make first of three attempts to march from Selma to Montgomery to demand removal of voting restrictions on black Americans. On March 21 ML King finally led 3,200 marchers to Montgomery.

1968

Jan-10

 

Vietnam

Lt. Colonel Enzo Franklin Klinner, Jr. authorized to accept and wear the VIETNAMESE PARACHUTIST BADGE (Honorary) presented to hi by the Government of the Republic of Vietnam.

1968

Jan-30

 

Saigon, Vietnam

Vietcong launch Tet-offensive on U.S. Embassy in Saigon

1968

May-13

 

Vietnam

Lt. Colonel Enzo Franklin Klinner, Jr. awarded the AIR MEDAL WITH “V” DEVICE for “heroism while participating in aerial flight in the Republic of Vietnam on 1 FEB 1968.

1968

Mar-16

 

Vietnam

Mi Lai Massacre occurs in Vietnam War, 450 people die.

1968

Apr-04

TN

Memphis

Martin Luther King, Jr. assassinated; he was buried in Atlanta on April 9th.

1968

Aug-19

 

Vietnam

Lt. Colonel Enzo Franklin Klinner, Jr. awarded the COMBAT INFANTRYMAN BADGE (Second Award)

1968

Apr-11

DC

Washington

President Lyndon Baines Johnson signs Civil Rights Act of 1968 into law.

1968

Aug-24

 

Vietnam

Lt. Colonel Enzo Franklin Klinner, Jr. was awarded the PURPLE HEART MEDAL for wounds received in action on 21 May 1968 in the Republic of Vietnam.

1968

May-10

FR

Paris

Peace talks begin in Paris between U. S. and North Vietnam.

1968

Aug-24

 

Vietnam

Lt. Colonel Enzo Franklin Klinner, Jr. awarded the SILVER STAR MEDAL for gallantry in action in the Republic of Vietnam.

1968

Jun-06

CA

Los Angeles

Robert F. Kennedy assassinated by Sirhan Sirhan at the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles, CA, shortly after delivering a speech celebrating his victory in the 1968 Presidential primary of California.

1968

Nov-04

 

Vietnam

Lt. Colonel Enzo Franklin Klinner, Jr. awarded the ARMY COMMENDATION MEDAL for “distinguishing himself by meritorious achievement in ground operations in Republic of Vietnam during the period 1 May 1968 to 30 Sep 1968.”

1968

Aug 21-29

IL

Chicago

Democrats National Convention erupts into violent clashes between police and anti-war demonstrators.

1970

Aug-18

 

 

Lt. Colonel Enzo Franklin Klinner, Jr. awarded the LEGION OF MERIT for “exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding services from Dec 1968 to July 1970.”

 

 

 

 

 

1970

Aug

 

 

Lt. Colonel Enzo Franklin Klinner, Jr. retired from active duty in the U.S. Army after 21 years of service.

1971

Mar-31

 

 

Michael Calley sentenced to life in prison for Mi Lai Massacre during the Vietnam war.

1971

Jan-08

 

 

Sherri Lynn Amber, daughter and second child of Stan and Sondra Amber, born.

1972

May-15

MD

 

Gov. George Wallace shot while campaigning for President in Maryland. The assassination attempt left him paralyzed from the waist down.

1980

Sep-15

AL

Selma, Dallas County

Amry Willis Giles died.

1975

Apr-30

 

 

South Vietnam capitulated, ending the Vietnam War. American troops left the country in 1973

1980

Oct-02

IL

Cook County

Sondra Sue Mahan Amber died of breast cancer.

 

 

 

 

 

1987

May-09

AL

Chilton County

Albert Lomer Giles, Jr. died in Clanton, Chilton County.

1983

Jan-26

AL

 

Retired U. of Alabama football coach Paul “Bear” Bryant dies suddenly from a heart attack.

1987

Dec-04

AL

Chilton County

John Cecil Giles died in Clanton, Chilton County.

 

 

 

 

 

1992

Oct-31

AL

Chilton County

Enzo Franklin Klinner, Jr. died of cancer most likely stemming from “Agent Orange” exposure occurring during his tour in Vietnam.

 

 

 

 

 

1994

Feb-01

AL

Jefferson County

Travis Exel ‘Ted’ Mahan died in University of Alabama Hospital, Birmingham, Alabama, after failing to recover of a second heart surgery.

 

 

 

 

 

1997

Dec-27

AL

Chilton County

James Royce Giles died in Clanton, Chilton County.

 

 

 

 

 

2001

Mar-19

AL

Chilton County

William Ralph Giles died in Verbena, Chilton County.

 

 

 

 

 

2003

May-03

AL

Chilton County

Mary Louise Giles Mahan died in Mineral Springs of colon cancer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anyone researching early settlers to central Alabama (and many other parts of the country) are not surprised to find multiple connections between several families. The state was not very populated during the early and mid-1800's and extended familes usually remained in the same geographic area. It was not unusual for more than one marriage to link two families together, nor was it unusual for second or third cousins to marry each other. All of these circumstances resulted in the many links between the Robinson, Giles, Willis and Mahan families.

Researchers viewing My Alabama Roots family tree may notice that John Monroe Robinson (1817-1898) and his wife Nellie Ellena Davis (1822-1903) appear multiple times. In fact, three of this author's four grandparents descended from this couple. Similarly, two of these grandparents descend from John Giles (1781-18510 and Mary MNU (??-1840).

John Monroe Robinson and Nellie Ellena (Davis) Robinson were the parents of twelve known children.

  • John and Nellie's oldest son William R. Robinson (1840-1864) married Rebecca Sammons (1844-1894), daughter of Isham Sammons (1811-??) and Mary Ann "Polly" Giles (1812-18920 and granddaughter of John Giles (1781-1851). William and Rebecca had a daughter Loutish Elenor Robinson (1862-1903) who married Joseph Yerby Willis, Jr. (1865-1907). Born to Loutish and Joseph was a daughter Amry Loutish Willis (1894-1980) who married Albert Lomer Giles (1884-1967).

  • John and Nellie's fifth child and first daughter was Nancy Elizabeth Robinson (1850-1927) who married John Tyler Giles (1849-1938), son of Edmon O. Giles (1822-1886) and Elizabeth Robinson and grandson of John Giles (1781-1851). John and Nancy Giles' son Albert Lomer Giles (1884-1967) married Amry Loutish Willis (1894-1980) as indicated in #1 above. Amry's mother, Loutish Elenor Robinson, and Lomer Giles were first cousins, making Amry and Lomer first cousins once removed through the Robinson line at the time of their mariage.  Lomer and Amry had a daughter Mary Louise Giles (1915-2003) who married Travis Exel Mahan (1915-1994).

  • John and Nellie's sixth child and second daughter was Rachel Paraline Robinson (1854-1906) who married Henry Matison Mahan (1852-1923). Rachel and Henry had a son Zediciah Robinson Mahan (1883-1947) who married Prudye Myrtle Ford (1884-1970). Zed and Prudye's son Travis E. Mahan (1915-1994) married Mary Louise Giles (1915-2003) as indicated above.

  • Travis "Ted" Mahan and Mary Louise (Giles) Mahan are the parents of this author, Linda Louise Mahan. Three of my great grandparents (Loutish Elenor Robinson, Nancy Elizabeth Robinson, and Rachel Paraline Robinson) all descended from John Monroe Robinson. Loutish Elenor Robinson (mother of Amry Loutish Willis), Albert Lomer Giles (husband of Amry Loutish Willis), and Zediciah Robinson Mahan (father of Travis E Mahan) were all first cousins, making Lomer and Amry first cousins once removed (I think!) through the Robinson line at the time of their marriage and Ted and Louise some kind of cousins when they married.

It is also interesting to note that Amry Willis' mother, Loutish Elenor Robinson's maternal grandmother Mary Ann "Polly" Giles is the sister of Edmon O. Giles, the paternal grandfather of Albert Lomer Giles. This makes Amry Willis and Albert Lomer Giles third cousins one time removed (I think!) through the Giles line at the time of their marriage...in addition to being first counsins once removed through the Robinson line.

Additional Info

  • Article Source

    Information provided by Linda L. Mahan, Chilton County, Alabama.

Published in Robinson

Three Willis brothers, sons of William Willis and Cicily Coats Willis, came to Shelby County, Alabama from Rowan County, North Carolina, probably by way of Tennessee.

Joseph Yerby is found in the census for 1860, 1870, and 1880. Based on the ages reported his birth year would be approximately 1825, 1816, or 1820 respectively. The family chose the 1880 census as probably the most accurate and listed 1820 as the birth date on his new tombstone. All three census list North Carolina as his place of birth and family lore specifies Rowan County. Several of his children have his birthplace as Tennessee on their death certificates. This, combined with other evidence, indicates that Joseph Yerby came to Alabama through Tennessee. The first documented evidence of him in Alabama is his marriage license to Lettice Williams taken out in Coosa County, Alabama on December 5, 1842 and married on December 15, 1842.

Additional Info

Published in Willis

Mineral Springs Baptist Church Cemetery, originally the Old Robinson Cemetery, is located on County Rd 51 in Chilton County, Alabama, accessed via State Hwy. 145 north from the Lay Dam exit of Interstate 65. 

First-Robinson-grave 500The cemetery originated when Sarah (Sallie/Sally)Robinson (b. 1866), the toddler daughter of John Monroe Robinson (1817-1898), fell into a vat of hot wax while family members were making candles. She died due to her injuries and was buried on a gentle hill near a large tree. Her grave is marked only by a pile of stones. The exact date of death is not known but is estimated to be abut 1868. The graves of her parents, John M. Robinson and his wife Nellie Elena (Davis) Robinson (1822-1903), are located nearby. Graves for members of the Robinson, Giles, Willis, Roberson and other related families were to follow as the "Robinson Cemetery" gradually became the cemetery for the small, rural Mineral Springs community, which at that time was composed of a number of inter-related families. A search of census records for Chilton County (originally Baker County), reveals many of the individuals buried here living next to each other, often linked by marriage or other close relationship. [see author's note at end of this article]

Published in Chilton County

John M. Robinson and his wife Nellie Davis Robinson, my great-grandparents, were born in 1817 and 1822 respectively, in the state of Georgia. They came into this area (Chilton County, AL, then Shelby County, AL) about 1840 after the birth of their first child, and built the old (water powered) Grist Mill on Yellow Leaf Creek. They also built a home that overlooked the creek and was just above the mill on the hill. My grandmother, Nancy Elizabeth Robinson (daughter of John M. Robinson), was born in this house in 1850, and was one of ten children born into the family. Another home now occupies the site of the originial home site of my great-grandparents.

Additional Info

  • Article Source


    Written by Mary Louise Giles Mahan (1915-2003) in 1999 and published in Heritage of Chilton County, Alabama, Heritage Publishing Consultants, Inc. 2000, page 314. Republished with permission of Louise Mahan's daughter, Linda L. Mahan, who has edited and reorganized the original article, adding full names for individual's mentioned and significant dates.

  • Research Notes


    Mary Louise Giles was born in Chilton County on August 5, 1915, the daughter of Amry Loutish Willis Giles (1894-1980) and Albert Lomer Giles (1884-1967). She married Travis Exel Mahan (1915-1994) and was the mother of two daughters. Louise, as she was known, died on May 5, 2003.

Published in Robinson

Amry Loutish Willis was born in Shelby County, Alabama on July 13, 1894, the daughter of Loutish Elenor (Robinson) and Joseph Yerby Willis, Jr.

Her mother died of pneumonia when Amry was only nine years old. Her father kept the family together following his wife's death but when he died unexpectedly three years later due to an accident at the railroad where he worked, the children were sent to live with their Uncle David Willis. Though her brothers (Napoleon Bonaparte, Wilburn Nodles, Martin Joseph, Edgar Clifton) stayed with the David Willis family, after a short time Amry went to live with her sister Hixie Rebecca (Willis) Smith who had married William Edward  Smith (1886-1953) only days before her father's death and was on her honeymoon when the accident occurred. Amry worked in the fields on the Smith farm and helped with the family cooking and housekeeping while living with her sister and brother-in-law.

Additional Info

  • Article Source

     
    The author, Linda L. Mahan is a granddaughter of Amry Willis Giles and writes from personal knowledge and additional information provided by Amry's two daughters, Louise Giles Mahan (Linda's mother) and Betty Giles Klinner.

  • Photo Credit


    Photo provided by Linda L. Mahan.

  • Research Notes


    Amry Loutish Willis, daughter of Joseph Yerby Willis, Jr. (1865-1907) and Loutish Elenor Robinson Willis (1863-1903), was born July 13, 1894 in Shelby County, Alabama. In 1912 she married Albert Lomer Giles (1884-1967), who was a third cousin. Lomer's mother Nancy Elizabeth (Robinson) Giles was an  aunt  of Amry's mother, Loutish Elenor (Robinson) Willis, with Loutish Elenor's father William R. Robinson being the brother of Nancy Elizabeth.

    The couple had seven children: John Cecil Giles (1913-1987), Mary Louise Giles Mahan (1915-2003), Albert Lomer Giles, Jr. (1922-1987), Joseph Wilburn Giles (1926-1944), William Ralph Giles (1928-2001), Betty Jean Giles Klinner (1931-Living), and James Joyce Giles (1933-1997). Amry died from cancer on September 15, 1980, in Baptist Hospital, Selma, Dallas County, Alabama. She is buried at Mineral Springs Baptist Church Cemetery.

Published in Giles

Mahan Family Tree

by Zediciah "Zed" Robinson Mahan
Written for his children in 1940's

In nineteen-four we two some how
Agreed to sign a marriage vow,
And share our troubles and our joys
By bringing up some girls and boys.

So late in nineteen hundred-five,
Gladys with those big blue eyes,
Came to take a leading role,
Which she did with all her soul.

Then came Ruth the next in line
Back in June of nineteen-nine,
Who never seemed to realize
That home was meant for kids her size.

Next came Herbert in thirteen,
First boy to show up on the scene,
Who proved to be the kind of boy,
That any parents would enjoy.

Nineteen-fifteen with World War One
Gave us Travis, another son,
Whose ambition was to see
How mischievous he could be.

Additional Info

  • Article Source


    Poem written by Zediciah ("Zed") Robinson Mahan (1883-1947) for his children in the 1940's, supplied by his granddaughter Linda L. Mahan, founder of My Alabama Roots.

  • Photo Credit

    Photo supplied by Linda L. Mahan, founder of My Alabama Roots.

  • Research Notes

     

    Zediciah Robinson Mahan, ca. 1944Zediciah Robinson Mahan, known to friends and family as "Zed", was the son of Henry Matison Mahan (1852-1923) and Rachel Paraline Robinson Mahan (1854-1906). Born April 22, 1883, he was the fourth of eight children in this family. He married Prudye Myrtle Ford (b. 08 Dec 1884), daughter of David Lillard Ford (1842-1900) and Indiana Shankle (1848-1887), on April 24, 1904 in Kaufman County, Texas.


    The couple had six children: Gladys Marie Mahan (1905-1965), Doris Ruth Mahan (1909-2000), Herbert Adolphus Mahan (1913-1972), Travis Exel Mahan (1915-1994), Holland Douglas Mahan (1918-1923), and Mildred Inez Mahan (1921-1970). Zed died of kidney cancer on October 24, 1947 in Montgomery, Montgomery County, Alabama, followed by Prudye 23 years later on September 24, 1970 in Birmingham, Jefferson County, Alabama, where she was living with her youngest daughter and family.

Published in Mahan

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